Make insecticidal soap for garden


Soap sprays are some of the oldest insecticides used by gardeners in the old days; gardeners used to boil water with Fels Naptha soap to create an effective soap insecticide. Over time, these "old fashioned" remedies fell out of favor as they were replaced by much stronger and more toxic chemicals. Today, however, as the interest in organic and less chemical intensive gardening continues to grow, insecticidal soap sprays have made a major comeback.

Insecticidal soap works through several mechanisms. The soap itself penetrates insects' cuticles, which causes cell collapse and desiccation. In other words, it dries them out. They also operate by suffocating insects such as scale insects . In general, soap sprays are effective for soft-bodied insects including mealybugs  and  aphids . To varying degrees, soap sprays are also effective against chiggers, earwigs, fleas, mites, scales, and thrips. They are not effective, however, on chewing insects such as caterpillars and beetles.

Although soap sprays are less toxic to gardeners and non-pest animals, they can still be potentially damaging to some plants, especially if an oil has been added to the spray. Before the widespread use of any spray, test it on a small section of the plant first and wait at least 24 hours to see if there are any negative effects.

This insecticidal soap spray can be made at home for only a few dollars.  It kills garden pests by coating their bodies with oil.  Since insects breathe through their skin, it smothers them.  Then the oil stays on the leaves making them inhospitable to further predation.  But it won’t harm pets or humans.  Avoid spraying on fruit shrubs with open flowers and pollinators at work. 

This can be used on fruit trees, shrubs, canes, and vines.  Avoid spraying on the vegetable garden, as the oil will cling to the leaves of your vegetables.  It won’t harm the vegetables, but it may make them taste funny.  For the vegetable garden hand picking and using diatomaceous earth is more effective than a foliar spray.

Do not add any other ingredients.  Do not substitute dish soap or laundry soap for the liquid castile soap.  These are not the same chemically and could damage your plants.  Powered herbs or spices will plug the spray nozzle of your applicator. 

Insecticidal soap is based on potassium fatty acids and is used to control many plant pests. Because insecticidal soap only works on direct contact with the pests, it is sprayed on plants in way such that the entire plant is wetted. Soaps have a low mammalian toxicity and are therefore considered safe to be used around children and pets and may be used in organic farming .

Insectidal soap is most effective if it is dissolved in soft water, since the fatty acids in soap tend to precipitate in hard water , thereby reducing the effectivity. [1] [5]

Insecticidal soap is sold commercially for aphid control; these may not always use the word soap, but they will list "potassium salts of fatty acids " or "potassium laurate " as the active ingredient. Certain types of household soaps (not synthetic detergents ) are also suitable, [1] but it may be difficult to tell the composition and water content from the label. Potassium-based soaps are typically soft or liquid.

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Soap sprays are some of the oldest insecticides used by gardeners in the old days; gardeners used to boil water with Fels Naptha soap to create an effective soap insecticide. Over time, these "old fashioned" remedies fell out of favor as they were replaced by much stronger and more toxic chemicals. Today, however, as the interest in organic and less chemical intensive gardening continues to grow, insecticidal soap sprays have made a major comeback.

Insecticidal soap works through several mechanisms. The soap itself penetrates insects' cuticles, which causes cell collapse and desiccation. In other words, it dries them out. They also operate by suffocating insects such as scale insects . In general, soap sprays are effective for soft-bodied insects including mealybugs  and  aphids . To varying degrees, soap sprays are also effective against chiggers, earwigs, fleas, mites, scales, and thrips. They are not effective, however, on chewing insects such as caterpillars and beetles.

Although soap sprays are less toxic to gardeners and non-pest animals, they can still be potentially damaging to some plants, especially if an oil has been added to the spray. Before the widespread use of any spray, test it on a small section of the plant first and wait at least 24 hours to see if there are any negative effects.

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Make insecticidal soap for garden
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