Kill leatherjackets


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020 3176 5800
Mon – Fri | 9am – 5pm

Biological control is the use of natural enemies to control pests. In the home garden this can be done by introducing predators or pathogenic nematodes. This technique is mainly used in greenhouses, but some biological controls, including pathogenic nematodes, can be used out of doors.

Suitable for: Biological control can be an effective alternative to pesticides
Timing Mainly used April to September

Leatherjackets are the dull-grey legless larvae of crane flies. The adult crane flies lay eggs in lawns, from which the leatherjackets emerge. During the day, they shelter in vertical tunnels just under the surface. At night they come up to the surface and eat the grass.

Steinernema carpocapsae (Capsanem) is a nematode that can be used for the control of many different pests, among which leatherjackets. The nematode uses a so called ambush strategy. For this reason the nematode is very effective against mobile insects. It waits until a larvae passes and then pounces on it. The nematode will then quickly try to enter the larvae through a natural body opening. Under optimal conditions this will take a couple of hours and the infected larvae will be killed within 1-2 days.

The nematodes are active against the first and early second larval stage. If the larvae are larger the effect will be less, so it is important to observe early presence to obtain the best effect.

Leatherjackets Back to all plant problems. Leatherjackets can be damaging in lawns and sometimes kill small plants in flower beds and vegetable plots by eating roots ...

Leatherjackets in lawns. Leatherjackets are a pest in the lawn. They are the larvae grub of the Cranefly, and eat the roots of lawn grass.

Pitchcare's technical guide on identifying, understanding, and controlling Crane Fly or Leatherjackets through biological and chemical methods.

A These pests are the grubs or larvae of crane-flies (Tipula species) better known by their common name, daddylong-legs. They have long thin legs, narrow bodies and slender wings. Although several different kinds of crane-fly produce damaging leatherjacket grubs, they are hard to distinguish. They all do similar damage and are dealt with in the same way.

A Leatherjackets eat the underground parts of plants, including seeds. Sometimes on warm humid nights, they come up to the surface to feed, cutting through plant stems at soil level and munching holes in the foliage. Where plants are close together, as in lawns, bare dead patches can result. Where plants are further apart – in borders or the vegetable garden, for example – the first you know of an attack is the sudden wilting and death of the plants. The cause of this damage can be confirmed by scraping away the soil or lifting turf. The culprits will not be far away.

A Look for grubs 2.5-4cm long. They are greyish brown or even black, with tough leathery skins enclosing a soft body. Leatherjackets do not have a distinct head or legs. Their colour makes them difficult to spot.

denverk.bcu.cc

General enquiries
020 3176 5800
Mon – Fri | 9am – 5pm

Biological control is the use of natural enemies to control pests. In the home garden this can be done by introducing predators or pathogenic nematodes. This technique is mainly used in greenhouses, but some biological controls, including pathogenic nematodes, can be used out of doors.

Suitable for: Biological control can be an effective alternative to pesticides
Timing Mainly used April to September

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Kill leatherjackets
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