Keep cats off of window screen


The outdoor cats in my neighborhood (Jefferson) have mastered the art of opening my garbage can so they can feast on whatever they find inside. They often spread garbage about in the process. I’m all for a local regulation to curb this nuisance.

We recently got a kitty and have kept him indoors, but when the kids and I go in and outside on a nice spring day, he seems longing to come out. What about the idea of having the cat live a more natural, albeit, shorter life? I’m reconsidering my decision and would love to hear the thoughts of others. And, what is the thinking about declawing indoor cats? Our vet said no big deal, is it?

I’m guessing the garbage can raiders are more often raccoons. We let our cats out and we understand the risk, but they are insanely happy fellas–plus they’re in all night.

Every morning Martha, a stately Maine coon mix, sashayed across the breakfast table and made a beeline for her favorite windowsill, shedding cat hair into the butter and flinging litter granules from her long furry tail along the way. When Mitch noticed clay particles floating in his coffee mug for the third morning in a row, he erupted. “No more cats on the kitchen table!” he bellowed-and Martha seemed to get the message. But by 7:30 the next morning, Martha’s march began anew. Short of barring her from the kitchen, Mitch wondered how he could put an end to Martha’s “surface shenanigans.”

Before you can train your cat to stay off a forbidden surface, you must decipher why she’s drawn to it in the first place. Whether tabletops, counters or infant changing tables, cats like high platforms from which they can view their territory. If these surfaces provide other pleasures, as well, all the better. Is there leftover food on the stove? Is the kitchen table next to the window that overlooks the birdbath? Is the changing table warm, cozy and comfortably padded? When surfaces offer such tempting rewards, it’s hard to convince a cat to keep away.

First, remove the rewards that make a surface so appealing. If your cat enjoys snacking on crusty remains left in cooking pans, let them soak in the sink before sitting down to a meal. If she likes to lounge on the sunlit windowsill at the end of the kitchen table, “remove” the rewarding sunshine by pulling the shades down or putting up shutters.

Contrary to popular belief, a warm fur coat does not keep you (nor a cat) warm all through the wintertime. While cats are normally independent, they do need our help to get them through the cold of winter.

Outside cats need regular feeding on a daily basis. This is necessary for two very important reasons. The first reason is that well-fed cats are better hunters. Yes, yes...it sounds counter-productive, but in reality, a well-fed cat hunts better. A cat is only successful 2-3 times per 10 times that it hunts. (This is true whether you're talking about domestic cats or their larger cousins.) Cats need food on a daily basis so they can be strong enough to hunt.

Not all cats have a strong urge or desire to hunt; let alone eat what they hunt and kill. Cats have different personalities, just like us humans do. Over the years, I've seen my own cats differing personalities - some were great mousers, some were great bird hunters, and some didn't really care to do much more than look outside the windows and be amused.

Using  cat repellent plants is as natural as you can get in your battle to deter cats from your garden and this will appeal to those people who for whatever reason can’t or don’t want to use any of the commercial cat deterrents .

In the UK cats are allowed to roam wherever takes their fancy and if you are a gardener who doesn’t want them visiting your garden, using plants to deter cats is going to make a lot of sense.

A few strategically placed plants that cats hate should mean they get to exercise their right to roam by quickly moving on rather than pooping in your flower beds or sunbathing in your vegetable patch.

Diabetes is sometimes diagnosed as the result of a routine blood test and the luckiest cats are treated before symptoms show up. Most are diagnosed because the owner noticed one or more of the primary signs:

The object of diabetes treatment is to control the blood glucose so it stays in (or near) the normal range, as it would be if the pancreas were still producing insulin naturally. For food to be properly utilized, insulin must be available to convert the food into a useable state. The pancreas would naturally regulate blood sugars by slowly releasing insulin, and unfortunately injected insulin doesn't act quite like natural insulin, nor is it practical to just shoot a little in every time the cat eats.

You need to consider additional ways to help control your cat's blood sugar. Diet is the most important part of treatment and some cats can actually be diet-controlled. Although many vets are not aware of it, current research indicates that a high protein, low carbohydrate diet is best for cats. Since cats are obligate carnivores, they don't have the proper enzymes to digest plant-based protein, so avoid any foods that use plants as the primary protein source. For choosing the best food for your cat, you can review some excellent articles on this type of diet in the Health Articles section of this site.

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The outdoor cats in my neighborhood (Jefferson) have mastered the art of opening my garbage can so they can feast on whatever they find inside. They often spread garbage about in the process. I’m all for a local regulation to curb this nuisance.

We recently got a kitty and have kept him indoors, but when the kids and I go in and outside on a nice spring day, he seems longing to come out. What about the idea of having the cat live a more natural, albeit, shorter life? I’m reconsidering my decision and would love to hear the thoughts of others. And, what is the thinking about declawing indoor cats? Our vet said no big deal, is it?

I’m guessing the garbage can raiders are more often raccoons. We let our cats out and we understand the risk, but they are insanely happy fellas–plus they’re in all night.

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